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A View from Below

clientsfromhell
The links don’t light up when I hover my finger over them on the iPad. They’re just underlined and blue. How will anyone know they are links?

THIS.

The People Who Scrub the Internet

I’m deeply saddened that such jobs are necessary. However, I don’t think we can thank these people enough for bearing through thousands and thousands of graphic images, possibly saving children’s lives in the process.

davidtennantspants

Obama has already said he will uphold net neutrality, meaning SOPA will be vetoed if it makes it to his desk

Glorious.

inanoffwhiteroom:

the-ghost-girl:

princekarkat:

good president, best friend

#Obama doesn’t wanna lose his blog

Thank goodness. Also, ^great tag

Understanding the internet

Understanding the internet

Kids who were in 8th grade in 2004 have gone through their entire high school and college careers consulting (i.e. plagiarizing) Wikipedia; to them, Wikipedia is a dull black box—editing it seems just a bit more possible than making revisions to Pride and Prejudice. And Twitter and Facebook have sucked up all the cognitive surplus younger internet users might have once devoted to building up Wikipedia and shattered it into a million fleeting hashtags.

Wikipedia Is Slowly Dying

A MILLION FLEETING HASHTAGS.

(via zenparty)

I was in 8th grade in 2004. What is this ridiculousness?!

(via datingmysofa-deactivated2013052)

This is an interactive infographic about the internet at the world state in 2011. It’s a little overwhelming, and there’s no real way to take it all in. However, if you have time to sit and learn: go for it.

This is an interactive infographic about the internet at the world state in 2011. It’s a little overwhelming, and there’s no real way to take it all in. However, if you have time to sit and learn: go for it.

Why HTML5 matters.

Why HTML5 matters.

ianbetteridge

Entradista: "Nobody surfs the web anymore"

(via ianbetteridge)

Steve Rosenbaum, at Confab 2011:

“Nobody surfs the web anymore. The waves are too damn big.”

He’s right. And the thing is that we’ve mostly created the waves ourselves with the deliberate intention of stopping surfing.

People don’t surf the web. They go to a few regular sites. They gather feeds together using RSS. They ping straight off to links gathered via social media (and then jump straight back to Facebook again). But they don’t surf, hopping from link to link, site to site, in the way that we used to.

Why is that?

First, because of the intoxicating power that search engines deliver to get instant answers. Type in a question – bang. Instant result!

But secondly, and I think more importantly, because the people who build sites have adopted a view of users that looks more like a railroad than a highway. We think that we can – and should – put the users on tracks to the holy destination of conversion, and anything that lets them drift away from that ultimate destination is to be avoided like the plague. They might wander off a little – but only so far as we’ll let them, before we start putting in roadblocks and placing big fat signposts down to get them back on the road.

We’ve made the waves too high to surf. We’ve trained users, like performing monkeys, to press a button and get a reward. And that’s a little sad.

You can see it in our persona work. Look at the average persona template. There’s a nice dinky bit of narrative, and then we’re straight into the goals. The user must have goals. Why else would they be online, right? Why else might they be on our site?

We talk about user journeys, but those user journeys are like train travel – the driver, us, is in control. They user is just buying a ticket (and, in most cases, isn’t even aware of it). We talk about funnels, shovelling in people at the top and getting conversions at the bottom. Grist to the mill.

As content people, with years of experience in creating stuff that people want to read, watch, and engage with, we need to be wary of talk like this. We need to remember that users – people – are human beings and not performing animals that you can prod and poke and reward into doing what you want. That personas don’t become so dictatorial that the “goals” in them (always an abstraction, and too often aligned directly to the company’s goals) don’t limit real people who come to our sites. We need to remember that sometimes, people need to surf, to feel a part of things and not just fodder for the conversion mill.

And we need to remember that the best companies, the best brands, have enough confidence in what they do that they allow a little space for their customers to be themselves. Some space to surf.

Are you interested in how youth act on the web? Check out this totally awesome Prezi presentation that I made.

Are you interested in how youth act on the web? Check out this totally awesome Prezi presentation that I made.